Crimson Trace

SUBSCRIPTION    SUBMIT RELEASES    ADVERTISE    ARCHIVES    CONTACT                                  FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014
— TOP STORY
In a new order released today, Federal District Court Judge Anthony W. Ishii rejected two requests made by California Attorney General Kamala Harris in the dispute, captioned Silvester, et al. v. Harris, that was filed in Fresno nearly three years ago. | For More...

— CONSERVATION
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) will hold a public meeting on December 4, 2014 to discuss a draft Land Protection Plan and Environmental Assessment (draft LPP/EA) for the proposed Wyoming Toad Conservation Area project in Albany County, Wyoming. | For More...

— ENFORCEMENT
Paul Haptonstall, of New Orleans, pleaded guilty to the illegal selling of game fish violations on Nov. 18 in the New Orleans Municipal Court in Orleans Parish. | For More...

Hunting outfitter and guide Christopher W. Loncarich, 56, of Mack, Colorado was sentenced to 27 months in prison, and 3 years probation for conspiring to violate the Lacey Act, a federal wildlife protection law. | For More...

— EVENTS
December is delightful at Maryland's Calvert Marine Museum with activities and programs for all members of the family. Visit the "new" website for a complete listing at www.calvertmarinemuseum.com. | For More...

— FISHERIES
The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department, the N.H. Department of Environmental Services (DES) and the N.H. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) will hold a joint public information meeting on new shellfish area closures for 2015 on December 2 in Portsmouth. | For More...

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), at its Nov. 20 meeting in Key Largo, approved publication of a draft rule for new manatee protection zones for inshore waters of western Pinellas County. | For More...

At its meeting in Key Largo on Nov. 20, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved lowering of the red grouper recreational bag limit from four to two fish per person in Gulf of Mexico state waters, excluding Monroe County. | For More...

— HONORS & AWARDS
Shana Ramsey of Kalamazoo, Michigan, recently was honored as the Steve Campbell Outstanding Aquatic Educator by the Aquatic Resource Education Association at its biennial conference in Traverse City, Michigan. | For More...

— HUNTING
From the Upper Mississippi to Oklahoma and Texas, Hard Core Brands managers are watching the travel of northern birds through the flyway. | For More...

— INDUSTRY
Sportsman Channel has extended its exclusive agreement with Pigman: The Series through 2015. This extension is a result of the popularity of "Pigman" as one of the top shows on Sportsman throughout the past five seasons. | For More...

Bushnell is pleased to announce that they have received a number of Brilliance Awards from OpticsPlanet Inc., retailer of sports optics, tactical gear, scientific products, hunting gear, and eyewear. | For More...

Crimson Trace has won two Brilliance Awards from OpticsPlanet: Laser Sights Brand of the Year and Best Tactical Laser Sight. | For More...

— MEDIA
This week, Anthony and Reed take a look at the line of offerings from accessories and parts maker MAGPUL, , an industry leader in | For More...

— NEW PRODUCTS
With the new MarCum® PanCam system, you can fish the hole at your feet and see a live feed on your smartphone from an underwater camera up to 300 feet away, giving the freedom to hole hop without missing the action at home base. | For More...

While the new UTG TL-MP150Q Monopod stays true to this initial purpose for hunters on long forays in the wilderness, it can also be mounted directly to any 1913 Picatinny rail, or stabilize crossbows and spotting scopes. | For More...

TWN Industries Inc. announces the release of their "One Nation Traditional- Reduced" film pattern, following the mass appeal and popularity of its big brother. | For More...

— ORGANIZATIONS
The seminar and autograph schedules have been announced for the Hunter Christmas Exposition at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation's inaugural expo, which will take place Dec. 4-7 at the Las Vegas Convention Center (LVCC). | For More...

Ariel Wiegard has joined the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership as director of the TRCP Center for Agricultural and Private Lands, working to enact policies that balance production agriculture with fish and wildlife and sustain and enhance public access to private lands. | For More...

The Ruffed Grouse Society (RGS) and American Woodcock Society (AWS) urge members to participate in the 2014 RGS and AWS Member-Get-A-Member Campaign. To participate, current RGS and AWS members must simply recruit a fellow grouse and woodcock hunter for membership. | For More...

The National Wild Turkey Federation (NWTF) recently announced a partnership with NASCAR driver Ryan Newman. The racing veteran, who recently wrapped up a great racing season, will act as spokesperson for the Save the Habitat. Save the Hunt. initiative. | For More...

— PRODUCTS
Stren has produced a two-minute video that gives the angling community and fans of "American-Made" products something to gloat about. From its infancy, Stren was produced in the USA, and with unwavering support from its users Stren is one of the most recognizable fishing lines on the market today. | For More...

— PUBLISHING
In a GUNS Magazine online-only article, Mark Kakkuri reviews Taurus' new Curve, a pistol with a curved frame to enhance concealed carry.
| For More...

— RADIO
It's a new book from famed trainer Massad Ayoob, building a customized AR, and more, this week on Tom Gresham's Gun Talk® Radio. | For More...

— RECREATION
According to a survey conducted by AnglerSurvey.com, when asked how many children each angler had taken fishing in the past 12 months, 20 percent said they had taken a single child, while 21 percent took at least two. Nearly 10 percent of anglers reported taking three children fishing, six percent took four and an impressive 10 percent took five or more kids fishing in the past year | For More...

— RETAIL
TROY® kicks off their Thanksgiving Week Sale with BRAVO Friday on November 21. The $599 TROY Bravo is a gas-operated semi-automatic rifle chambered in 5.56 and showcases some of their most popular products, allowing shooters an opportunity to get a real feel for a Troy Defense military quality rifle at an unbeatable price. | For More...

Black Friday deals come early at MidwayUSA, and the countdown starts now! Beginning Monday, November 24th MidwayUSA will kick off 8 Days of Deals on popular Shooting, Reloading, Gunsmithing and Hunting products. Select products will also be eligible for free shipping. | For More...

Cabela's Incorporated, the World's Foremost Outfitter® of hunting, fishing and outdoor gear, will uphold the company's tradition of closing its U.S. retail stores and business offices on Thanksgiving Day. | For More...

— SAFETY
The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's Home From The Hunt™ campaign reminds everyone who is hunting during the holiday season to make safety the top priority. | For More...

Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds snowmobilers to travel safely this winter and to review state regulations that apply to this recreational activity. | For More...

— SPONSORSHIPS
Federal Premium® Ammunition is now the presenting sponsor of the National Pheasant Fest & Quail Classic, which will take place February 20-22, 2015 in Des Moines, Iowa. | For More...

— STATE PARKS
Winter is settling in, but there's plenty of cold-weather fun planned at Michigan's Sleepy Hollow State Park this December. Several free programs, open to participants of all ages, will be held the first three Saturdays of the month at 11 a.m. | For More...

— STATES
At its meeting in Key Largo on Nov. 20, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved lowering of the red grouper recreational bag limit from four to two fish per person in Gulf of Mexico state waters, excluding Monroe County. | For More...

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources currently is offering 11 state-owned properties in seven counties for sale by sealed-bid auction at www.michigan.gov/landforsale. The auction began Nov. 5 and will run through Dec. 2, 2014. | For More...

— SWEEPSTAKES
Walther Arms, Inc. is excited to give consumers 17 different chances to win by giving away guns & ammo prizes totaling $3,000 between now & Christmas. | For More...

Gunwatcher.com is giving away over $20,000 worth in prize packages to lucky participants. Anyone can enter, and there is no entry fee. Simply register for an account on Gunwatcher.com. | For More...

FEATURE
In Praise Of Pocketknives
Editor's Note: Today's feature was sent to us by outdoor author and editor Jim Casada in response to yesterday's listing of the 10 Worst Cities in America for Knife Owners from Knife Rights. Originally written for S.C. Wildlife magazine, it captured the award for Excellence in Craft in the magazine short features category of the Southeast Outdoor Press Association (SEOPA) last year. As you read and enjoy it, you'll understand why. Wordsmithing, like common sense, is a rare commodity.


Case--Buck--Barlow--Remington--Gerber--Schrade. Once these and other brands of pocket knives were names with which to conjure, instantly recognizable to an appreciable percentage of the population, at least in my part of the world. Folks took pride in carrying, displaying, and using their knife of choice, and most males over the age of 12 carried one. Youngsters looked on the acquisition of their first knife as a significant rite of passage while fathers considered a two- or three-blade pocketknife as indispensable as car keys or work tools. Grizzled old codgers in country stores or beneath shade trees on small town squares swapped blades, whittled, and told tales as an integral part of their daily routine. Pocketknives were an important part of life.

How things have changed.

A few years back I visited the local Social Security office. A genial gentleman in uniform greeted me at the door with a cheery "good morning" and the comment: "You look like a man who would carry a pocket knife."

I thought that strange but took it as a compliment and enthusiastically replied: "Yep. As a matter of fact I'm carrying two. Do you want to see them?"

That wasn't what he wanted to hear. Politely but firmly, he informed me I couldn't enter the building carrying a pocket knife, and of course the same holds true for boarding an airplane or entering many public buildings, a pointed reminder of how dramatically society has changed since my 1950's boyhood.

A few weeks ago I noticed a news piece about a boy getting in trouble for carrying a pocket knife to school. It seemed pretty innocuous, at least on the surface. A teacher apparently noticed a bulge made by the knife sticking out of his pocket. Nothing more. Obviously the boy broke school rules and had to face the consequences, but the hapless lad's situation speaks volumes about the world in which we live as well.

When I was a teenager in the 1950s, virtually every boy carried a pocket knife, not only when fishing or hunting but in school as well. The few who didn't wished they had one. If a female teacher asked whether anyone had a knife to assist her with some classroom chore, chances were every boy in the class raised his hand in a fashion far more enthusiastic than responses to academic questions. We boys used pocket knives for recreation and in all sorts of practical ways: gutting and scaling a mess of fish, cleaning squirrels or rabbits, widening the opening in a split shot so it could be easily affixed to a fishing line, or performing any of dozens of chores around home. We were taught practical knife safety and how to use a whet stone. The standard measure of whether a knife blade was sufficiently "keen" involved seeing if it would easily shave the hair off one's forearm. If not, it needed additional sharpening.

And if boys of my generation took pride in carrying a pocket knife, adults considered them absolutely essential. At Loafer's Glory, as the town square where I grew up was known, knives were a focal point of activity second only to playing checkers. There was constant knife swapping, with exchanges of blades vying with swapping of lies for pride of place. Genial arguments about the comparative merits of different styles such as Barlow (not only a brand name but a two-bladed knife), Stockman (three blades), and Congress (four blades) were commonplace. The same held true when it came to allegiance to a particular manufacturer.

Those knife lovers were old men enjoying well-earned leisure after a lifetime of hard work, but the folding blades they traded and talked about were also the quintessential working man's tool. Neither my father nor paternal grandfather would have even thought of setting foot out of the house without their trusty knife handy. Both owned a goodly selection from which to choose, and thanks to disappointment from early boyhood at not getting a knife one Christmas, Daddy saw to it that his sons and later his grandsons were always appropriately outfitted in that department.

While writing this piece I paused to ponder how the knife I carry has been used over the course of the last year or so. The varying work accomplished with it, and I know the list which follows is but a select sampling, amazed me-harvesting garden vegetables such as squash, cabbage, eggplant, okra, cucumbers, and zucchini; peeling apples and peaches; suckering tomato plants; cutting off sections of twine to tie tomatoes to stakes; gathering gladiolas, zinnias, snapdragons, and dahlias from the flower garden for household decoration; opening daily mail and shipments of books; extracting briars from my fingers; cleaning trout; removing giblets from wild turkeys; whittling a piece of wood to hold a latch in place; prying open the lid on a balky toothbrush so the battery could be replaced, gouging out a shotshell in a dove field when the gun's ejector failed, and much more. Simply put, without a knife it would be difficult for me to function.

Even in his later years, to the age of a hundred and beyond, my father always kept a pocketknife handy. Dad kept his knives razor sharp, rightly reckoning that one which wasn't finely honed wasn't fit to carry. Today I proudly carry one of Dad's pocket knives, as do my brother, all of his boys, a first cousin, and even my daughter. I can't speak for the others, but the little two-blader I carry, with its bone handles and simple design, gives me a momentary mental boost every time I take it out of my pocket. It's a constant reminder of a time when folks lived close to the earth and a knife was considered a necessity. Today's urbanized world seems increasingly out of tune with a lifestyle where pocket knives deserve praise and a prominent place in daily life. They are, in short, increasingly part of a world we have lost.

How terribly sad.

-Jim Casada
Nov 29-30
Hernando Sportsmen's Club, 16121 Commercial Way (Highway 19), Brooksville, FL
Dec 4-7
The Mirage Hotel & Expo Center, Las Vegas, NV
Dec 4-7
Las Vegas Convention Center, Las Vegas, NV
Dec 20
Universal Shooting Academy - Frostproof, FL
Jan 14
Elm Fork Shooting Sports, 10751 Luna Road, Dallas, TX 75220
Jan 20-23
Sands Expo Center, Las Vegas, Nevada
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